This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 31st, 2011

Posted In: Brand algemeen

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 31st, 2011

Posted In: Museum thefts

Dear subscribers,
The Museum Security Network website and mailing list have been on line since December 1996. So we end our 15th year. A milestone. In the past 2,5 years some 9,700 messages have been send to our subscribers. So, in all the past 15 years this will total to circa 50,000 messages. Quite an archive of misery (most of the time) in the cultural property world.
The Museum Security Network Google group has some 700 subscribers from a large number of countries.
Next to the Museum Security Network Group we also maintain a number of groups dedicated to a somewhat limited subject matter (see below).
The MSN moderator, and editors wish you all safe and secure 2012.
Museum Security Network – manage
no activity in the last 3 minutes
library Security and Safety – manage
2 messages 2 new topics
last week
museumthefts – manage
7 messages 7 new topics
last week
insider_theft_msn –manage
1 message 1 new topic
last week
art_forgery – manage
2 messages 2 new topics
last week
art_vandalism – manage
no activity in the last week
auction_houses –manage
1 message 1 new topic
last week
threat_to_african_cu lture – manage
no activity in the last week
museum_fires – manage
3 messages 3 new topics
last week
theft_religious_obje cts – manage
no activity in the last week
provenance_and_museu ms – manage
no activity in the last week
illicit_antiquities –manage
1 message 1 new topic
last week
museum – manage
1 message 1 new topic
last week

December 31st, 2011

Posted In: Mailing list reports

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 31st, 2011

Posted In: fakes and forgeries

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 31st, 2011

Posted In: Mailing list reports

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 31st, 2011

Posted In: Mailing list reports

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 30th, 2011

Posted In: Fire in cultural institutions

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 30th, 2011

Posted In: Museum thefts

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 29th, 2011

Posted In: diefstal uit kerken

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 29th, 2011

Posted In: fakes and forgeries

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 29th, 2011

Posted In: Fire in cultural institutions

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 29th, 2011

Posted In: insider theft, library theft

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 29th, 2011

Posted In: Mailing list reports

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 28th, 2011

Posted In: Museum thefts

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 28th, 2011

Posted In: Mailing list reports

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 27th, 2011

Posted In: Museum thefts

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 27th, 2011

Posted In: Museum thefts

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 26th, 2011

Posted In: Museum thefts

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 26th, 2011

Posted In: insider theft

tomflynn: The theft of public sculpture has got to stop

http://tom-flynn.blogspot.com/2011/12/theft-of-public-sculpture-has-got-to.html

December 22, 2011

Two nights ago a gang of scumbag opportunists broke through the gates of Dulwich Park, just five minutes from where I live in South London, and stole an important work of outdoor sculpture —

Two Forms (Divided Circle)

 of 1970 (

left

) — by the great British modernist artist Barbara Hepworth (1903-1975). A popular local landmark, the 7ft high sculpture had stood beside the lake undisturbed for the past forty years, just a stone’s throw from Dulwich Picture Gallery opposite.

Art theft is all too familiar in Dulwich. The Gallery, designed by Sir John Soane, architect of the British Museum, is Britain’s oldest public art gallery and has been targeted by thieves on more than one occasion. In 1966, Michael Hall, an unemployed ambulance driver, drilled a hole in a door and made off with three Rembrandts, three works by Rubens, and paintings by Adam Elsheimer and Gerard Dou. Happily the pictures were recovered a short time later, some of them discovered wrapped in newspaper under a bush in Rookery Park, Streatham, another popular pleasure spot.

In market value terms, Barbara Hepworth’s bronze cannot compare with Rembrandt’s Girl at a Window, but that is hardly the issue. Its real value is in the pleasure it gives to countless thousands of strolling dog-walkers, joggers and families on their Sunday outing. Its scrap value may be fairly significant to the despicable thugs who stole it, but as an important work of public sculpture by one of Britain’s preeminent modernist artists it is irreplaceable and in that sense, priceless. Why, then, have local authorities offered just £1000 for information leading to its recovery? How brainless is that?

Hepworth’s Two Forms can now be added to the melancholy roll-call of public sculpture stolen as a result of soaring scrap metal prices. The list is beginning to read like the index of a book on British sculpture as works byLynn ChadwickHenry Moore, and William Goscombe-John — to name just a few — have disappeared from public locations in recent years, never to be seen again.

This is not just another scrap metal problem. Granted, we’re not talking about overhead cabling from a railway line, the theft of which can endanger human life. But the theft of sculpture can have a profound effect on local communities. A crudely truncated stump is now all that’s left of Hepworth’s elegant abstract form — another ghastly reminder of the philistinism spawned by the economic downturn.

Public sculpture theft is now out of control and something has to be done before all our parks and public spaces are desecrated in this way. I have no remedy for this problem, but if I were a chief at the Met I’d sure as hell light some fires under a few people. At present, the web pages devoted to metal theft at the Centre for Problem-Oriented Policing (POP) make almost no reference to art or sculpture theft save to point out how inadequate security encourages thefts. It’s time someone at the Met gave POP a new department — POP (ART).

We may not know who stole the Hepworth, but whoever they are will have set up a yard willing to melt it down. Those locations and the people who run them should also be known to police.

The Dulwich theft is worrying for another reason. The park was supposed to be secure. The gates (right) are locked every night, so the thieves had to break in and drive a van through the park in order to remove the work. What are the insurance implications of this? How many other parks will now be looking at what they believed were reasonable security measures and thinking again? If a set of ten-foot high iron gates aren’t enough to keep out these vermin, what is?

I have a lovely little watercolour (left) of Barbara Hepworth’s

Single Form

 of 1961-62, which stands beside the lake in Battersea Park. Hepworth made the sculpture as a memorial to her friend, UN Secretary General Dag Hammarskjold, who died in an air crash in Africa in 1961. Like the Dulwich work,

Single Form

amplifies the natural rhythms of the lake and surrounding park, subtly enhancing the experience of moving through the landscape. My watercolour — which I bought direct from an artist working at the Watts Gallery in Compton a few years ago — shows the park under snow when the sculpture takes on a different ambience.

Single Form is in good company at Battersea, sharing the park with Henry Moore’s Three Standing Figures and Eric Kennington’s dignified war memorial to the 24th Division that served at the Western Front. Happily the Moore and the Kennington are both in stone and so — for the time being at least — are relatively safe. The Hepworth should now be put under closer watch.

tomflynn: The theft of public sculpture has got to stop.

December 22nd, 2011

Posted In: BLOG World (from related blogs)

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 22nd, 2011

Posted In: Museum thefts

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 22nd, 2011

Posted In: Museum thefts

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 20th, 2011

Posted In: Museum thefts

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 19th, 2011

Posted In: Museum thefts

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 19th, 2011

Posted In: Museum thefts

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 19th, 2011

Posted In: diefstal uit museum

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 19th, 2011

Posted In: Museum thefts

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 19th, 2011

Posted In: Uncategorized

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 19th, 2011

Posted In: diefstal uit museum

NOK ONCE MORE

http://www.museum-security.org/opoku_nok.htm

December 17, 2011

NOK ONCE MORE

It is indeed unfortunate that so much Nok material has been looted over time to supply the international market. Properly excavated, such pieces might have shed valuable light on the Nok culture.   Ekpo Eyo (1)

Nok figure of a seated male with crossed arms, to be auctioned at Htel des Ventes de Doullens  http://www.herbette. fr

Recently, a very observant reader drew the attention of the Nigerian authorities to a proposed auction of a Nok sculpture in a French auction house(2) The Nigerian Commission for Museums and Monuments, the body established by law to protect and preserve cultural artefacts of Nigeria promptly sent a strong message to the French auction house requesting the suspension of all acts relating to the Nok object until its true provenance has been established.  Suspension of the sale and discovering the true provenance of the Nok artefact would help Nigeria to discover how such an object was taken out of the country and enable the authorities to prevent such illegal activities.

A few months ago, there was an exhibition, entitled AFRIKA AFRIQUE AFRICA in Vienna.  According to the catalogue, there were 73 Nok pieces in the exhibition. One whole hall was devoted to Nok sculptures(3)  It has been said that some of the Nok sculptures displayed may well be fakes. This is a question we would leave to Nok specialists. What interests us here is the justification often advanced for keeping African artefacts, including Nok objects, in Western museums, institutions and in private collections. One such justification was given in the catalogue of the exhibition.

Nok sculptures in the exhibition AFRIKA AFRIQUE AFRIKA

The catalogue  includes five essays by Armand Duchteau and one by Karl- Ferdinand Schaedler entitled, Against the Destruction of Art Objects – The Other Side of Restituting Cultural Assets.(4)   This essay is interesting from several points of view, especially,  as the  author seems to put the British Museum and other Western Museums as being in the forefront of the struggle for restitution and preservation of African artefacts. One can see the essays potential for causing confusion in the minds of many. The author refers to discussion on the preservation of national cultural possessions revived by the opening of boundaries in Eastern Europe and the large number of African artefacts, especially the Nok objects, that are available on the open market.:

  This abundance of finds presumably plays a role in the fact that a number of museums in Europe and the US are choosing not to acquire any Nok pieces ( (which some of these institutions are already regretting).  According to Schaedler, museums refrained from acquiring such objects because they were afraid of criticism from their own country and from the countries of origin of the objects. As a further indication of the unease of the museums, he states, was that during the 1995/96 exhibition, Africa; The Art of a Continent at the Royal Academy, London, archaeological finds from Mali and Nigeria were shown only on videos for the British Museum had threatened to withhold objects it had agreed to lend if the allegedly illegal objects were displayed. According to the author, the efforts to bring the issue of cultural preservation of African artefacts

died quickly becauseno one on the African side seemed to be interested in these cultural assets, unless it was for purely financial reason. Besides, those objects that were restituted quickly returned to the art market. Dr. Schaedler does not specify which objects and their country of origin. The author argues that all the efforts to preserve cultural objects are, as far as Africa in concerned, impositions from the West. For Africans, he argues, what matters is the present and not the past. Europeans  have been brought up to preserve the past:

 As far as Africa is concerned, this entire situation seems to be based on a deeply rooted cultural misunderstanding. What is being put forward here is the image of the nave African who is unable to manage his own affairs: economic neo-colonialism is now being followed by its cultural counterpart in its purest form. What we in the West do is right. And the others must follow suit if they intend to become part of the community of civilized peoples. They must preserve their culture and protect their cultural heritage; they must not only live for today, but also consider yesterday and tomorrow. These are certainly maxims with which we in America and Europe grew up, ideals which seem right to us and which we hold in high regard. And why not? But these principles must not necessarily hold true for other cultures   

 If those in the West feel compelled to preserve cultures and erect museums this is solely their view of things. In Africa this idea generally meets with incomprehension. And if Africa – where since the end of the Cold War colonialism has again been rearing its head –   is not allowed to maintain its right to independence in economic and political affairs, it should at least  have the right in the area of culture.

This statement contains various ideas which cannot be left uncommented.

What Schaedler is saying in effect is that Europeans are trying to impose on Africans the idea and obligation to preserve their cultural artefacts. He considers this a form of colonialism in the cultural field. The author not only makes assumptions that are not supported by history and historical experience but also seems to ignore various international efforts such as UNESCO Conventions, UN resolutions, decisions of international conferences and other bodies to preserve cultural artefacts in all continents including Africa.

It is obvious that Africans did not need Europeans to tell them to preserve objects of their cultural heritage. Had Africans not preserved their cultural objects, there would have been none for the Europeans to loot or steal when they came to the Continent. Somebody must have looked after the various African objects that European invaders looted or colonial administrations and adventurers confiscated. And who preserved the famous Benin bronzes before they were looted in 1897 by the British in their infamous Punitive Expedition? Surely, common sense would indicate that these Benin bronzes, kept in the palace of the Oba of Benin were preserved by the people of Benin who did not

need any Europeans to advise them on the need to preserve cultural objects that had been preserved for hundreds of years. What about the Dogon sculptures that had been preserved for hundreds of years before they were stolen by the French in their notorious Dakar-Djibouti expedition in 1936? (5)

Surely the expert has heard the view often expressed by many that Africans venerate their ancestors hence many sculptures such as the Kota reliquaries. Some have even said Africans worship their ancestors. Are these the marks of those who do not care about the past and the future? What about the view often expressed  that the African concept of ownership of land is based on the belief that the land belongs to a whole lot of people of whom some have died, some are living but a lot more are to come. Could this also be a characteristic of a people who only live for the present?

Even assuming that Africans did not preserve their cultural objects before contact with Europe, surely the relationship that started in the 15th century must have left their marks. Various museums have also been built in many African countries during the colonial rule. Is one entitled to disregard these museums which have the main function of preserving cultural artefacts? Is one to ignore also the classes that have grown up in these five hundred years and their cultural development both in terms of African and European cultures?

What is very remarkable is that Dr. Schaedler completely ignores the existence of UNESCO and the Convention on the Means of Prohibiting and Preventing the Illicit Import, Export and Transfer of Ownership of Cultural Property 1970. (6) The author seems to ignore the fact that the Convention as well as various instruments impose on States, including the African States, an obligation to preserve their cultural heritage. He even goes so far as to say that

After all, the legal premise that all goods lying beneath the earth are the property of the country in which they are found certainly has no legal or moral basis and in the final analysis can be seen as a holdover from the colonial era.  Can a person with some familiarity with European history make this assertion?  Is the author aware that the 1970 UNESCO Convention attributes to the cultural heritage of the State cultural objects found on its territory? Article 4 of the Convention reads as follows:

Article 4

The States Parties to this Convention recognize that for the purpose of the Convention property which belongs to the following categories forms part of the cultural heritage of each State: 
(a) Cultural property created by the individual or collective genius of nationals of the State concerned, and cultural property of importance to the State

concerned created within the territory of that State by foreign nationals or stateless persons resident within such territory; 
(b) cultural property found within the national territory; 
(c) cultural property acquired by archaeological, ethnological or natural science missions, with the consent of the competent authorities of the country of origin of such property; 
(d) cultural property which has been the subject of a freely agreed exchange; 
(e) cultural property received as a gift or purchased legally with the consent of the competent authorities of the country of origin of such property.

Of course, Schaedler ignores all the efforts made by bodies such as UNESCO, United Nations and ICOM (International Council of Museums) and other bodies in the area of preservation of culture. It is remarkable that Dr.Schaedler can write about restitution of African artefacts, especially about the Nok artefacts without mentioning for once the Nigerian Commission for Museums and Monoments, the body specifically charged with preservation of Nigerian cultural artefacts, a body whose consent is required for legal exportation of artefacts from Nigeria. Or are the activities of the Commission regarding control of exportation of artefacts not relevant to the issues we are discussing?

Can an expert in African art and culture afford, in the long run, to ignore historical facts and the work of UNESCO, ICOM , the Commission for Museums and Monuments and other bodies, write about Africans in a derogatory, if not racist,   tone which we thought had disappeared with the end of colonialism?

Looted Nigerian Nok Sculpture in Louvre, Paris

NOTES

1.  Ekpo  Eyo, From Shrines to ShowcasesMasterpieces of Nigerian Art, 2010, Federal Ministry of Information and Communication, Abuja. p.23The preamble to ICOM red List Africa reads as follows:  The looting of archaeological items and the destruction of archaeological sites in Africa are a cause of irreparable damage to African history and hence to the history of humankind. Whole sections of our history have been wiped out and can never be reconstituted. These objects cannot be understood once they have been removed from their archaeological context and divorced from the whole to which they belong. Only professional archaeological excavations can help recover their identity, their date and their location. But so long as there is demand from the international art market these objects will be looted and offered for sale.    http://archives.icom.museum/redlist

ICOM red List

See also K.Opoku, Recovering Nigerians Terracotta http://www.modernghana.com

Revisiting Looted Nigerian Nok Terracotta Sculptures in Louvre, Muse du Quai Branly, Paris     http://www.myweku.com

http://www.modernghana.com

Does the Demand for the Restitution of Stolen African Cultural Objects Constitute an Obstacle to the Dissemination of Knowledge about African  Arts? Comments o a Letter from Philippe de Montebello, Director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

http://www.afrikanet.info

2. http://tinyurl.com/c8clw3o

3. Herbert Stepic(Ed.) Afrika Afrique Africa, Christian Brandsttter Verlag, Wien, 2011, pp. 162-169; :http://www.stepic-collection.com/de/informationen.html

http://www.stepic-collection.com/de/vernissage.html

4. H. Stepic, pp. 16-23.

5. See Michel Leiris, Afrique Fantme, 1953, Gallimard, Paris

6. http://portal.unesco.org/en/ev.php-URL_ID=13039&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html.

NOK ONCE MORE.

December 17th, 2011

Posted In: Dr. Kwame Opoku writings about looted cultural objects

Bloomsbury man makes historic contribution to Crisis at Christmas with magnificent gift to Greece

Art In Your Mouth

http://www.artnose.co.uk/

December 16, 2011

By our sovereign debt correspondents
Lucinda Leverage  and Nicolas McMerkel

LONDON:
Saint Neil MacGregor, the quietly spoken patron saint of Bloomsbury today astonished the museum world by sending the Parthenon Marbles back to Athens.

As the ancient fragments were loaded on to the back of a flatbed truck outside the front entrance to the British Museum, Saint Neil took a small chopped shallot from his inside pocket and wiped a tear from his eye.

Visibly moved by his own magnanimity and clearly struggling to maintain his legendary composure, he  clutched to his breast a copy of his recently-penned international best-selling blockbuster A History of the World in 100 Looted Objects Belonging to the British Museum and to Nobody Else, So There.

“Greece is teetering on the edge of the abyss,” said the frail Scottish saint as he watched the venerable ancient fragments being man-handled onto the back of the waiting lorry. Wiping his nose on a dog-eared replica of the notorious firman that had enabled Thomas Bruce, Seventh Earl of Elgin to desecrate the Parthenon in the early nineteenth century, Saint Neil’s voice cracked as he delivered a rousing valediction to the objects that have for so long mired his museum in ignominy and shame.

Falling to his knees, he raised his eyes to heaven and cried out in a reedy Caledonian brogue, “With these marbles, I beseech ye Oh Lord! Deliver the Greek people from the economic apocalypse created by the dismal hedge fund managers, financial speculators and  hateful purveyors of Collateral Debt Obligations and Credit Default Swaps who still cast their dark spell in the Square Mile and in that other den of vice across the pond.”

At that moment the sky was rent asunder and an enormous shower of hummus, olives, retsina and overcooked spaghetti bolognaise rained down upon the assembled throng of weeping curators and cheering news reporters.

“‘Tis a sign! ‘Tis a sign”,” cried Saint Neil, beating his breast and taking up a copy of Museums Journal, with which he began self-flagellating.

At that point the van loaded with cultural booty drove off in the direction of the Eurotunnel as Saint Neil and his distraught staff staggered back to the sanctuary of their  Universal Museum, swigging great draughts of Metaxa Triple X to alleviate the post-colonial fever spreading amongst them like an airborne virus.

Santa Claus is 103.

via Art In Your Mouth.

December 16th, 2011

Posted In: BLOG World (from related blogs)

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 16th, 2011

Posted In: WWII

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 15th, 2011

Posted In: fakes and forgeries

Hot Doc: A Damage Assessment at the Getty Finds Forgery, Fraud and Fabricated Histories | CHASING APHRODITE

http://chasingaphrodite.com/2011/12/14/hot-doc-a-damage-assessment-at-the-getty-finds-forgery-fraud-and-fabricated-histories/

December 15, 2011

The true cost of looting has always been hard to measure: how does one account for what is lost? Perhaps this is why some — Americans in particular, it seems — tend to think of looting as a victimless crime.

In truth, looting has many victims — the artifacts lost or damaged during the act itself; the defaced monuments and pockmarked archaeological sites left in its wake. Then there is the more pernicious effect of plunder and the black market it fuels — the corruption of our knowledge about the past.

Jiri Frel with The Getty Bronze

This is what the Getty Museum confronted in 1984, after the hasty departure of its charming and crooked antiquities curator Jiri Frel. In his decade at the Getty, Frel had used any means necessary to build the museum’s antiquities collection into one worthy of the Getty’s wealth. In 1984, when his criminal activity was discovered amidst an IRS investigation, he abruptly left the country, leaving colleagues at the museum to clean up the mess.

John Walsh, Getty Museum Director

A confidential June 1984 memo from acting antiquities curatorArthur Houghton to museum director John Walsh was an early attempt to account for the damage done by Frel’s collecting practices. We’ve posted it below as part of our Hot Docs series, a effort to publish some of the key confidential files we used while reporting Chasing Aphrodite.

Arthur Houghton III

“Changes or additions to the central files registry should be recorded for many of the objects in the antiquities collection,” Houghton noted with characteristic understatement. “The scope of the problem is quite large and involved a number of areas.”

Among the problems Houghton reported:

– Falsified provenance: Many of the ownership histories of objects in the collection were “mythical.” Frel and his trusted dealers had made a parlor game of inventing bogus European collections like “Esterhauzy” to cover the fact that the objects being purchased were fresh from an illicit dig.

– Bogus attributions: Frel had often gussied up the attribution of objects to make them more palatable to the public or the Getty’s own acquisition committee. Roman copies were listed as Greek originals; a 3rd century BC sculpture became the only surviving piece by a Greek master.

The Getty bought the kouros in 1985 for $10 million. Today it is believed to be fake.

– Forgeries: Frel had bought several multi-million dollar fakes, either because he was fooled or (more likely) in exchange for a cut of the purchase price. The most famous is the nearly $10 million Getty Kouros, still on display today at the Getty Villa. As Houghton noted, “Several [fakes] are of major importance and involve very high values and the Museum’s reputation.”

Then there were the lies that mostly hurt the Getty: Frel had convinced the museum to dramatically overpay for objects, with some of the money likely coming back to him in kickbacks. He had inflated valuations of objects as part of a tax fraud scheme and invented phony donors — many still honored on Getty display placards– who he used to launder objects coming into the collection.

The Getty bought his sculpture in 1979, believing it was a head of Achilles by Skopas, a famous Greek sculptor. Subsequent research showed that it was a modern forgery.

In time, some of the most egregious distortions were corrected. The Getty kouros today is awkwardly labeled “Greek, about 530 B.C., or modern forgery,” and several other fakes were taken off display. But in many more cases, Houghton noted the damage to the historical record was irreversible. “Much of the suspected provenance and acquisition (including donation) information is fragmentary; and while many records can be corrected in time and with reasonably diligent attention, it will not be possible with reasonable discretion to probe into the true provenance or acquisition history or many objects in the collection.”

The truth, in other words, was lost.

Today, similar distortions  and fabrications litter the antiquities collections of America’s great museums, which are tax-exempt because their public mission is education. In doing business with the black market, museums have betrayed that mission and filled their shelves with what amount to beautiful lies.

HOT DOC: June 1984 confidential memo from Arthur Houghton to John Walsh.

Article: “An Art World Detective Story: The Getty’s Head of Achilles” Suzanne Muchnic, LA Times, 11/3/88

Hot Doc: A Damage Assessment at the Getty Finds Forgery, Fraud and Fabricated Histories CHASING APHRODITE.

December 15th, 2011

Posted In: BLOG World (from related blogs)

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 14th, 2011

Posted In: fakes and forgeries

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 14th, 2011

Posted In: Uncategorized

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 13th, 2011

Posted In: looting and illegal art traffickers, Museum thefts

Gent by Honeywell solution for The Wallace Collection

Supplier: Gent by Honeywell
More Gent by Honeywell details

Gent by Honeywell solution for The Wallace Collection

The prestigious national art museum, The Wallace Collection, will be one of the first buildings to install the Gent by Honeywell new hybrid radio fire alarm system.
Gent will supply its new Plexus system as part of the museum’s ongoing refurbishment programme.

Kent based fire specialist, D Tecta Fire will supply, install and commission the system for the historic four storey building, the solution including a hard wired Gent Vigilon analogue system in a number of public areas, linked to loop powered radio transceivers supporting wireless devices in public areas.

The allows for the least disruptive installation of a replacement fire system in the fully operational building.

The site’s radio signal strength is limited due to the nature of the building which is why the technology of the Plexus system lends itself to this particular project.

Plexus enables each wireless device to act as a transceiver and create the opportunity for a range of transmission paths with other nearby devices.

The longest radio link is therefore never more than one device away, which forms a network built up of varying lines of communication. This reduces the risk of loss of device communication due to radio dead spots in the building.

Plexus has a single common panel as the point of control for hard wired and wireless devices which enhances operational control and management of the fire alarm system. Sensing technology developed for the Gent S-Quad sensor range means that once the system is installed, it will minimise unwanted false alarms.

Plexus will be installed in The Wallace Collection early in 2012 and the installations will be phased with the hardwired core element being installed first.

A successful radio survey was carried out using the Plexus equipment within the exhibition areas in the museum prior to the planned installation.

 

Supplier: Gent by Honeywell
Leicester Leicestershire UK
Gent by Honeywell is synonymous with quality and innovation in the fire detection and alarm industry.Web: www.gent.co.uk
More Gent by Honeywell details

via Attractions Management – Gent by Honeywell: Gent by Honeywell solution for The Wallace Collection.

December 13th, 2011

Posted In: museum security

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 13th, 2011

Posted In: Museum thefts

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 13th, 2011

Posted In: religious artifact theft, theft religious objects

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 12th, 2011

Posted In: Auction Houses and stolen objects

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 11th, 2011

Posted In: restitution, WWII

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 11th, 2011

Posted In: fakes and forgeries

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 11th, 2011

Posted In: Museum thefts

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 8th, 2011

Posted In: Museum thefts


http://www.museum-security.org/stolen_statue_arthur_azevedo_don_quichoxe.htm

December 8, 2011

Stolen Art

Stolen by means of house breaking at Milton Park, Harare
in the early hours of Thursday, 10th November, 2011, the sculpture

Don Quixote

Macintosh HD:Users:toncremers:Desktop:image (1).jpg
 
by
Arthur Azevedo
Metal – 30x25x10cms
Should anybody have any information pertaining to the stolen work and 
its whereabouts please advise
Derek Huggins – 04-729135/04-708378
and
Police Constable Chiriminga
Milton Park Police
0777-654848

.

December 8th, 2011

Posted In: Mailing list reports

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 8th, 2011

Posted In: Uncategorized

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 8th, 2011

Posted In: fakes and forgeries

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 8th, 2011

Posted In: museum security

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 8th, 2011

Posted In: insider theft, library theft

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 8th, 2011

Posted In: Museum thefts, WWII

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 7th, 2011

Posted In: Museum thefts

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 7th, 2011

Posted In: looting and illegal art traffickers, Struggle against illicit trade in cultural heritage

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 7th, 2011

Posted In: Museum thefts

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

December 7th, 2011

Posted In: Fire in cultural institutions, sprinklers