Some tensions have been created after an incident of theft occured in Kalu Para Daser Bari Kali Mandir at Goila union of Agoiljhara upazila under Barisal district on Sunday, the Janmastami birthday of Lord Krishna.

Md. Ali Biswas, officer in charge and Abdul Latif Molla, upazila nirbahi officer of Agoiljhara and local Hindu community leaders said unknown miscreants breaking the locked collapsible gate of the temple entered and broke a left hand of Goddess Kali, stole gold plated eye balls and eye brews and a brass-cooper metal made 4 inch height statue of Radha-Krishna in darkness of Sunday early hours.

Perhaps the miscreant thought that the statute as made by precious touch stone and later finding it as normal stone left the place by breaking a hand of the deity and stealing other item, police suspected.

Shyamol Krishna Das, Sebayet (caretaker) of this Kali Mandir, Dulal Das Gupta, member secretary of historical Manosha Mandir of Goila and other local leaders of Hindu community, said that the incident was a simple matter of theft and without any communal intension.

Toufiq Mahbub Chowdhury, district Police Super along with Basudev Acharaya Vashai,Manik Mukherjee Kudu,Narayan Chandra Naru,Shamayal Acharaya, Vishnupada Mukherjee, leaders of Barisal Ramakrishna Mission, Puja Udjapon Parishad and Hindu-Buddha-Christian Oikya Parishad visited the spot on Sunday afternoon and talked with the local people.

They all opined the matter as non-communal attempt of theft the statue and ornaments.

SP ordered local police to find out the miscreants and recover the stolen items as early as possible with the help of local people after lodging a case in this connection.

http://nation.ittefaq.com/

August 31st, 2008

Posted In: looting and illegal art traffickers

The leading archaeologist in Iraq says that sites are no longer being targeted by professional looters. The Art Newspaper spoke by telephone with Dr Abbas al-Husseini, who took over from Dr Donny George as chairman of the state board of antiquities in 2006. A year ago he was removed, because of internal politics, and he is currently working as a professor at Al Qadisiyah University and supervising excavations.

Speaking from Diwaniya, south of Baghdad, Dr al-Husseini told us that although there had been severe looting in Iraq in 2003, this had declined very considerably in 2004 and has diminished yet more since then. “Professional looting has ended, although just like anywhere in the world there may be some occasional digging by children,” he told us.

Dr al-Husseini cites several reasons for the improvement: “Religious leaders have issued fatwas against damaging our heritage. Guards with proper facilities are protecting sites. Iraqi archaeologists have resumed excavating, which means the sites are better monitored.” He also says that the black market in antiquities seems to have stopped, “so looters get nothing for their work”.

In our July-August issue, we revealed that an international team led by Dr John Curtis of the British Museum had visited southern Iraq a month earlier. No evidence of post-2003 looting was found at any of the eight sites they inspected. Our article generated considerable controversy, provoking strong reactions from both ends of the political spectrum.

http://www.theartnewspaper.com/includes/common/print.asp?id=16008

August 31st, 2008

Posted In: looting and illegal art traffickers

* Cyprus. Tomb raiders plundering Kourris Valley antiquities
http://groups.google.com/group/museum-security-network/browse_thread/thread/3ffa283e58e83bcc?hl=en

* Response to Post From CAARI VP Ellen Herscher about Clay Constantinou, Patton Boggs and Cyprus
http://groups.google.com/group/museum-security-network/browse_thread/thread/1a5c55f4053e4d34?hl=en

* BONES DO NOT DIE: GERMANS TO RETURN NAMIBIAN SKULLS.
http://groups.google.com/group/museum-security-network/browse_thread/thread/c65cbee70c5de135?hl=en

* A PLEA FOR FAIR AND EQUAL TREATMENT: COMMENTS ON AN ARTICLE BY ALAN BEHR ENTITLED “A HUMANIST PLEA FOR FREE-RANGING ANTIQUITIES”
http://groups.google.com/group/museum-security-network/browse_thread/thread/0768c4817e51cb67?hl=en

* Arab posing as J’lem tour guide nabbed for selling ancient coins to tourists
 http://groups.google.com/group/museum-security-network/browse_thread/thread/3e57eab3c3456d74?hl=en

August 20th, 2008

Posted In: Cyprus, looting and illegal art traffickers, Mailing list reports

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In an article entitled, “A Humanist Plea for Free-ranging Antiquities,” (1)

Alan Behr, a New York lawyer praises James Cuno’s book, Who Owns Antiquity? Everyone is entitled to his or her opinion but surely we must try to base our opinions on facts and also on a broader understanding of the issue we are dealing with. It seems to me that Behr has based his views on a very narrow and false understanding of the issue at the centre of the debate generated by Cuno’s book.

He seems to think the debate is between those who would allow free movement of antiquities and those who would restrict such a free movement, in the name of nationalism and cultural purity. He sees on the one hand, “the museums that, like bees ranging over a broad field, pollinate the world with the art, history and culture of its constituent regions. The Elgin Marbles were carved in Athens and the Rosetta Stone was found in Egypt, but they are now displayed at the British Museum, in London. The Pergamon Altar was built by the Greeks, removed from what is now Turkey and is on view in Berlin.” He immediately supports this side.

 

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August 19th, 2008

Posted In: Dr. Kwame Opoku writings about looted cultural objects

We have had the occasion to refer to the problem of the thousands of African human remains that are still in European museums many decades after independence and the duty to repatriate them on dignified terms and conditions. *

 

As indicated in the report below, the Germans have stated their willingness to return 47 Namibian skulls. However, the Germans are insisting on an official request from the Namibian government. The Namibian Prime Minister, Nahas Angula, has rightly responded that when the Germans were taking away those skulls they did not ask anybody for permission.

 

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August 19th, 2008

Posted In: Dr. Kwame Opoku writings about looted cultural objects

This book corresponds to what I think the average visitor to an exhibition needs: a short introduction to the subject-matter, with illustrations and sufficient information for the reader to understand the significance of the theme without being burdened by too many pages.

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August 14th, 2008

Posted In: Dr. Kwame Opoku writings about looted cultural objects

There are probably few countries in the world that can boast of such an abundance of cultural treasures as Nigeria, one of the richest countries in the world. But Nigeria has also an enormous amount of organizational problems which are also reflected in the cultural area. The constant lamentations about the weak security in many Nigerian museums often cause distress to those concerned about the fate of cultural objects that were unlawfully taken out of the country and which have to be returned in the future. Those conscious of these problems are discussing how to combat corruption in this area and how to achieve high standards of security.
The report below shows that many concerned groups and individuals are seeking ways to ensure that museum officials are accountable and that the authorities responsible for cultural matters are working towards high standards.

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August 13th, 2008

Posted In: Dr. Kwame Opoku writings about looted cultural objects

The objective of the current exhibition (26 June – 5 October 2008) in the Pergamon Museum, Berlin, entitled “Babylon: Myth and Truth”, is, according to the official website, “to explore the myth of Babel and the true facts surrounding the ancient city of Babylon: two worlds – one exhibition”. (1) A related Babylon exhibition has already been held in Paris (14 March – 2 June 2008) and another one will be held in London (13 November 2008 – 15 March 2009). The legends and symbolism arising from the myths of Babylon – Sodom and Gomorrah, myths of unrestrained hedonism, Tower of Babel – linguistic multiplicity and confusion, imprisonment and racial oppression, are no doubt very interesting and important and will be discussed by many commentators on the exhibition.(2) Not all visitors to the exhibition may be aware that Bob Marley and the Wailers, echoing Rastafarian beliefs and reflecting the views of many Africans and people of African descent, designated as Babylon the oppressive economic system and political hegemony of the West: ………….

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August 11th, 2008

Posted In: Dr. Kwame Opoku writings about looted cultural objects

THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO DISTANCES ITSELF FROM THE CONTROVERSIAL BOOK OF ITS DIRECTOR, JAMES CUNO, WHO OWNS ANTIQUITY?

Finally, the Art Institute of Chicago has reached the conclusion which others have been reached long time ago, that the position and the views Cuno and his followers have been propagating over a long period, are not conducive to good and friendly relations. The view that the strong can take the artefacts of the weak and keep them has never been morally acceptable, no matter what James Cuno, Director, Art, Institute of Chicago, Neil Macgregor, Director British Museum, Phillipe de Montebello, Director, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, may say to the contrary. That there has been so far no strong resistance to the activities of the Western museums should not be taken as evidence that they are on the right path.

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August 8th, 2008

Posted In: Dr. Kwame Opoku writings about looted cultural objects

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August 2nd, 2008

Posted In: Museum thefts

Stolen Caravaggio most likely a copy

There are very strong indications that the Carravaggio stolen in Odessa is either a copy or a painting after Caravaggio.

TC

August 2nd, 2008

Posted In: Museum thefts

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August 1st, 2008

Posted In: Museum thefts